Con esperanza y amor.

letter-experiment:

Largest amount of swag I have ever witnessed

letter-experiment:

Largest amount of swag I have ever witnessed

Publicado hace 5 días por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde naluno  Fuente ForGIFs.com

Publicado hace 1 semana por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde misantropico  Fuente brighthollowmedicinals

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde dicenlasparedes  Fuente dmig

"My biggest fear is that eventually you will see me the way I see myself."

—  Anonymous (via xrvchel)

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde m-e-s-t-i-z-a  Fuente xrvchel

fuckit-impaidd:

me

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde punkrockerlml  Fuente fuckit-impaidd

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde m-e-s-t-i-z-a  Fuente lastoneoutoflibertycity

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Reblogueado desde pushthemovement  

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde minicm  Fuente 88problemsbutapitchaintone


The Origin of the Palestine-Israel Conflict:
As the periodic bloodshed continues in the Middle East, the search for an equitable solution must come to grips with the root cause of the conflict. The conventional wisdom is that, even if both sides are at fault, the Palestinians are irrational “terrorists” who have no point of view worth listening to. Our position, however, is that the Palestinians have a real grievance: their homeland for over a thousand years was taken, without their consent and mostly by force, during the creation of the state of Israel. And all subsequent crimes — on both sides — inevitably follow from this original injustice.

Introduction
This paper outlines the history of Palestine to show how this process occurred and what a moral solution to the region’s problems should consist of. If you care about the people of the Middle East, Jewish and Arab, you owe it to yourself to read this account of the other side of the historical record.
The standard Zionist position is that they showed up in Palestine in the late 19th century to reclaim their ancestral homeland. Jews bought land and started building up the Jewish community there. They were met with increasingly violent opposition from the Palestinian Arabs, presumably stemming from the Arabs’ inherent anti-Semitism. The Zionists were then forced to defend themselves and, in one form or another, this same situation continues up to today.
The problem with this explanation is that it is simply not true, as the documentary evidence in this booklet will show. What really happened was that the Zionist movement, from the beginning, looked forward to a practically complete dispossession of the indigenous Arab population so that Israel could be a wholly Jewish state, or as much as was possible. Land bought by the Jewish National Fund was held in the name of the Jewish people and could never be sold or even leased back to Arabs (a situation which continues to the present).
The Arab community, as it became increasingly aware of the Zionists’ intentions, strenuously opposed further Jewish immigration and land buying because it posed a real and imminent danger to the very existence of Arab society in Palestine. Because of this opposition, the entire Zionist project never could have been realized without the military backing of the British. The vast majority of the population of Palestine, by the way, had been Arabic since the seventh century A.D. (Over 1200 years)
In short, Zionism was based on a faulty, colonialist world view that the rights of the indigenous inhabitants didn’t matter. The Arabs’ opposition to Zionism wasn’t based on anti-Semitism but rather on a totally reasonable fear of the dispossession of their people.
One further point: being Jewish ourselves, the position we present here is critical of Zionism but is in no way anti-Semitic. We do not believe that the Jews acted worse than any other group might have acted in their situation. The Zionists (who were a distinct minority of the Jewish people until after WWII) had an understandable desire to establish a place where Jews could be masters of their own fate, given the bleak history of Jewish oppression. Especially as the danger to European Jewry crystalized in the late 1930’s and after, the actions of the Zionists were propelled by real desperation.
But so were the actions of the Arabs. The mythic “land without people for a people without land” was already home to 700,000 Palestinians in 1919. This is the root of the problem, as we shall see.
Read More

The Origin of the Palestine-Israel Conflict:

As the periodic bloodshed continues in the Middle East, the search for an equitable solution must come to grips with the root cause of the conflict. The conventional wisdom is that, even if both sides are at fault, the Palestinians are irrational “terrorists” who have no point of view worth listening to. Our position, however, is that the Palestinians have a real grievance: their homeland for over a thousand years was taken, without their consent and mostly by force, during the creation of the state of Israel. And all subsequent crimes — on both sides — inevitably follow from this original injustice.

Introduction

This paper outlines the history of Palestine to show how this process occurred and what a moral solution to the region’s problems should consist of. If you care about the people of the Middle East, Jewish and Arab, you owe it to yourself to read this account of the other side of the historical record.

The standard Zionist position is that they showed up in Palestine in the late 19th century to reclaim their ancestral homeland. Jews bought land and started building up the Jewish community there. They were met with increasingly violent opposition from the Palestinian Arabs, presumably stemming from the Arabs’ inherent anti-Semitism. The Zionists were then forced to defend themselves and, in one form or another, this same situation continues up to today.

The problem with this explanation is that it is simply not true, as the documentary evidence in this booklet will show. What really happened was that the Zionist movement, from the beginning, looked forward to a practically complete dispossession of the indigenous Arab population so that Israel could be a wholly Jewish state, or as much as was possible. Land bought by the Jewish National Fund was held in the name of the Jewish people and could never be sold or even leased back to Arabs (a situation which continues to the present).

The Arab community, as it became increasingly aware of the Zionists’ intentions, strenuously opposed further Jewish immigration and land buying because it posed a real and imminent danger to the very existence of Arab society in Palestine. Because of this opposition, the entire Zionist project never could have been realized without the military backing of the British. The vast majority of the population of Palestine, by the way, had been Arabic since the seventh century A.D. (Over 1200 years)

In short, Zionism was based on a faulty, colonialist world view that the rights of the indigenous inhabitants didn’t matter. The Arabs’ opposition to Zionism wasn’t based on anti-Semitism but rather on a totally reasonable fear of the dispossession of their people.

One further point: being Jewish ourselves, the position we present here is critical of Zionism but is in no way anti-Semitic. We do not believe that the Jews acted worse than any other group might have acted in their situation. The Zionists (who were a distinct minority of the Jewish people until after WWII) had an understandable desire to establish a place where Jews could be masters of their own fate, given the bleak history of Jewish oppression. Especially as the danger to European Jewry crystalized in the late 1930’s and after, the actions of the Zionists were propelled by real desperation.

But so were the actions of the Arabs. The mythic “land without people for a people without land” was already home to 700,000 Palestinians in 1919. This is the root of the problem, as we shall see.

Read More

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde silencios-que-gritan  Fuente thepeacefulterrorist

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde make-the-music-go-bang  

bibliotecaillia:

Carta de Julio Cortázar a Edith Aron -inspiradora de La Maga- (Buenos Aires, 1951)

bibliotecaillia:

Carta de Julio Cortázar a Edith Aron -inspiradora de La Maga- (Buenos Aires, 1951)

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde zi-xiao-gong  Fuente

aseaofquotes:

Therese Anne Fowler, Z

aseaofquotes:

Therese Anne Fowler, Z

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde aseaofquotes  

Publicado hace 3 semanas por esperanzaylibertad
Reblogueado desde descubriendo-colores  Fuente la-petite-souris


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